Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Cultivation of native fish in Mexico: cases of success.

Abstract

Aquaculture practice in Mexico is commonly carried out with some freshwater species, which are introduced in the region for its production, with technology developed in other countries. The growth of this activity has been slow, sometimes leading to loss of investments due to difficulties in the implementation of foreign technological packages, poor selection and inadequate management of the species, or farming sites, and even confusing legal procedures. Mexico stands out for the development of crops of exotic species more than native species, of which most are freshwater type. There are thirty-four recorded species of freshwater fish, six of them are native and twenty-eight are introduced species. The success of cultivating native species lies mainly in the process of selecting species with potential and certain characteristics. Mariculture is relatively new in Mexico; it has been intensibly developed, mostly in the north-west of the country. It has a great potential due to the high commercial value of its species, excellent quality and demand in the market. Ornamental aquaculture is the most developed in Mexico; the main producer is the state of Morelos, with total technological expertise in production of introduced and native species. It should be noted that this success has been achieved, in some cases, with the support of projects from government institutions, universities, research centres, associations and private companies. Pointing out that the common factor for a successful aquaculture practice is an ecosystemic and sustainable approach, continuously improving practices and fish farming management, while complying with regulatory standards.