Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Development of a rapid assessment method for detecting insecticide resistance in spotted wing Drosophila (Drosophila suzukii Matsumura).

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Spotted wing Drosophila is an invasive pest of fruit crops in most production regions globally, and insecticides are commonly used for its control. The biology of this pest combined with repeated pesticide exposure increases the risk of resistance to insecticides. We tested malathion, methomyl, spinetoram, spinosad, and zeta-cypermethrin against multiple colonies from each state using a contact bioassay method to determine diagnostic doses for assessment of insecticide susceptibility in this species. These were used to test populations collected in Michigan and Georgia, USA. RESULTS: Concentrations required to reach 50% (LC50) and 90% mortality (LC90) were calculated for the tested populations, and male mortality consistently occurred at lower concentrations than female mortality. Fly mortality did not vary significantly among populations collected from unmanaged, organic, and conventional fields. Similar results were found using the diagnostic concentrations applied to glass jars. CONCLUSIONS: Using this method, samples of D. suzukii that are freshly caught or reared from fruit can be tested within 1 day for their mortality in response to discriminating doses of five key insecticides. This method can be used to inform proactive resistance management strategies within integrated pest management programs.