Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Enrichment of soil rare bacteria in root by an invasive plant Ageratina adenophora.

Abstract

The assembly of the root-associated microbiome provides mutual benefits for the host plant and bacteria in soils. It is interesting how invasive plants interact with the local soil microbial community and establish the soil bacterial community in the endosphere of these plants in the short term. In this study, we compared the bacterial community in the rhizosphere with that in the root endosphere of an invasive plant, Ageratina adenophora, using high-throughput sequencing. The results showed that the roots of A. adenophora selectively accumulated the genera Clostridium and Enterobacter, which are rarely distributed in the rhizosphere. This selective accumulation caused a switch in the bacterial composition at the phylum level from Bacteroidetes predominant in the rhizosphere to Proteobacteria dominant in the root endosphere of A. adenophora. Our data indicated the potential existence of a highly conserved signal recognition in which hosts, either invasive or native, enrich the endosphere bacteria, such as Clostridium, Enterobacter, etc., from the rhizosphere. Moreover, the accumulated bacteria were physiologically and genetically different at the strain level and displayed distinct roles in growth between invasive and native plants. The assembly of the bacterial community in the roots may be an advantageous strategy for A. adenophora in competition with native plants.