Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) invasion effects on litter, soil and microbial PLFA characteristics depend on sites and invaded forests.

Abstract

Aims: Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) invasions into adjacent forests are becoming increasingly common. Moso bamboo invasions affect litter quality, soil nutrients, and microbial community composition. Although these effects likely vary among invaded sites and forest types, this has not been investigated. Methods: We investigated moso bamboo invasion effects on carbon (C) and other major nutrients of litter and soil, as well as soil microbial community composition determined by phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in broadleaf or coniferous forests at three different sites in China. Results: Ordinations indicated that the effects of invasions on soil nutrients, litter nutrients, and soil microbial composition each varied among forest types and sites. Invasions consistently decreased litter C. Invasions tended to have larger effects on soil nutrients in coniferous forests. Except for bacterial groups in one coniferous forest site, invasions had positive effects on every soil group. Conclusions: Variations in direction and magnitude of invasion effects on litter properties, soil properties, and soil communities among community types and sites suggest that studies of effects of invasions on soils in a single invaded community may not be able to predict effects of an invasion at other locations, even when the original community is similar or occurs in the same site.