Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Avian biodiversity across Auckland's volcanic cone reserves.

Abstract

Auckland, a city with a population of approximately 1.7 million, is located directly on the Auckland Volcanic Field, a late Quaternary-era monogenetic field. There are at least 53 volcanoes across the field, many of which are of geological, cultural and ecological significance, such as for being reserves for native species; however, few assessments of the richness of avian biodiversity across the volcanoes have been made. To address this data shortfall, we conducted avian biodiversity surveys using stationary point counts within nine of Auckland's volcanic cone reserves. Thirty-eight species were detected across the sites, of which 18 were native. Our estimates of relative species abundances and detection probabilities revealed that the most common native birds within these reserves were silvereyes, tui and southern black-backed gulls, while common mynas, house sparrows, Eurasian blackbirds and eastern rosellas were the most common introduced species. In addition to tui and silvereyes, the presence of other natives critical to the functioning of native ecosystems, such as New Zealand fantails, grey warblers and New Zealand pigeon, suggest that the volcanoes possess a diverse native avifauna supported by native flora that warrant continued and intensified restoration efforts. We discuss several feasible strategies for improving faunal and floral biodiversity across the volcanic cone reserves. Continued avian biodiversity surveys are also of critical importance as they will enable us to further evaluate and prioritise restoration projects within Auckland's multitude of diverse volcanic cone reserves.