Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Research progress on genes related to ecological adaptability of Pomacea canaliculata.

Abstract

Pomacea canaliculata is one of the 100 worst invasive alien species disclosed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN), which impairs food agriculture and the stability of aquatic ecosystem of the invaded areas, and acts as an intermediate host of Angiostrongylus cantonensis for disease transmission. This species is difficult to prevent and control once a stable colony is formed, due to the high ecological adaptability and the lack of natural enemy. Research on the mechanisms of the ecological adaptability of P. canaliculata is of great significance for the prevention and control. Compared to other species, research on the functional genes of P. canaliculata is still in the preliminary stage, and the molecular mechanisms of the ecological adaptability are far less studied. In this article we review recent findings on the genes closely related to the mechanisms of the ecological adaptability of P. canaliculata, including heat shock proteins, trehalose synthase, multi-functional enzyme gene, perivitellin-2, and cytochrome P450. These results advance our understanding of the adaptability tendency of P. canaliculata under various environmental conditions such as temperature, food, predator, and molluscicides. Further insightful studies are still needed to reveal the regulatory mechanisms.