Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

An electrochemical analysis suggests role of gynodioecy in adaptation to stress in Cortaderia selloana.

Abstract

Cortaderia selloana is an invasive, gynodioecious species prevalent in Mediterranean area which contains both female and hermaphrodite specimens in the wild population. Using voltammetric data we show that the female and hermaphrodite specimens exhibit differential electrochemical response. Cortaderia selloana leaves from two different provenances in the Valencia Mediterranean area, Sueca and Cullera (Comunitat Valenciana, Spain), in the surroundings of the Albufera Natural Park, a peculiar ecosystem containing unspoilt dune beaches and forests, were studied to determine correlation of flower morphology with the plant's ability to adapt to stress conditions. Our data suggests that gynodioecy may contribute to increasing versatility in the plant under stress by efficiently neutralizing reactive oxygen species (ROS).