Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Ecological replacement of native rapeseed weevil (Ceutorhynchus albosuturalis) by invasive alien species, cabbage seedpod weevil (C. obstrictus) on rapeseed flowers in Korea.

Abstract

Despite rising global concerns over the potential impacts of invasive alien species on indigenous species, the consequences of such introductions are lacking. The cabbage seedpod weevil (CSPW, Ceutorhynchus obstrictus) was found invaded into Korea in the early of 1990s. A large-scale survey in Korea reveals that, in about 20 years post-arrival, the invasive CSPW has become the most abundant on rape flowers and spread almost parts of South Korea including Is. Jeju and Is. Ulleung. Its spread is concurrent with the habitat retraction to cruciferous weeds of the native rapseed weevil (RSW, C. albosuturalis). However, Is. Yeoseo located between the mainland and Is. Jeju, showed their ratio with about 1:1. It suggests that the population of CSPW recently entered this island. Although underlying mechanisms of the decline of native species and increase of invaded species remain unknown, the potential roles of exploitative competition cannot be ruled out. Given that invasive weevil can rapidly replace native congeners, increased level of surveillances is demanding to discourage further invasion of othe alien pests.