Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Linear and non-linear effects of goldenrod invasions on native pollinator and plant populations.

Abstract

The increased introduction of non-native species to habitats is a characteristic of globalisation. The impact of invading species on communities may be either linearly or non-linearly related to the invaders' abundance in a habitat. However, non-linear relationships with a threshold point at which the community can no longer tolerate the invasive species without loss of ecosystem functions remains poorly studied. We selected 31 wet meadow sites that encompassed the entire coverage spectrum of invasive goldenrods, and surveyed the abundance and diversity of pollinating insects (bees, butterflies and hover flies) and native plants. The species richness of native plants decreased linearly with goldenrod cover, whereas the abundance and species richness of bees and butterflies decreased non-linearly with increasing goldenrod cover. However, no statistically significant changes across goldenrod cover were noted for the abundance and species richness of hover flies. Because of the non-linear response, goldenrod had no visible impact on bees and butterflies until it reached cover in a habitat of about 50% and 30-40%, respectively. Moreover, changes driven by goldenrod in the plant and pollinator communities were related to species loss rather than species replacement. We demonstrated that the impact of goldenrod cover on a habitat is not instantaneous. Habit management aimed at preventing the invasion process and alleviating its impact should take into account that, for the non-linear relationships, the negative impact can appear rapidly after crossing the threshold point.