Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Does predator-driven, biotic resistance limit the northward spread of the non-native green porcelain crab, Petrolisthes armatus?

Abstract

Biotic resistance by native predators can limit the geographic range and abundance of non-native species following introduction into an ecosystem. Here we tested the hypothesis that the strength of predation pressure varies with latitude and limits the abundance and northward expansion of the non-native green porcelain crab, Petrolisthes armatus, whose northern range is also hypothesized to be limited by physical tolerances to cold temperatures. We quantified the predation risk of P. armatus across 400 km of the crab's invasive range along the coastline of the southeastern US. In addition, we measured the density of large P. armatus, habitat quality, and other environmental factors that may affect the crab's predation risk. Finally, we conducted a size-selective predator exclusion experiment to determine the predator species and size classes that may be consuming P. armatus. Results indicated that neither the density of large P. armatus nor its predation risk varied systematically with latitude. Instead, variation in predation risk was best explained by local site-level differences in habitat quality, the density of large P. armatus, and the mean abundance of predators. The predator exclusion experiment indicated that both small and large size classes of predators are capable of equally strong rates of predation on P. armatus. Together, our results suggest that although native predators readily consume P. armatus, they do not provide biotic resistance against its northward expansion. Instead, it seems likely that other latitudinally differential factors like low winter temperatures that decrease P. armatus survival are more influential in limiting the crab's northern expansion.