Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Physiological status of Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) affects their response to attractive odours.

Abstract

An improved understanding of the biology of the invasive pest, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) (Diptera: Drosophilidae), is critical for the development of effective management strategies. Trapping is one technique used for both detection and control; however, the efficacy of trapping can vary depending on the target insect's physiological state, its behavioural priorities and the type of attractant used in the trap. We conducted a series of caged trapping experiments and a greenhouse trapping experiment to investigate the effects of D. suzukii feeding status, age, mating status, ovipositional status and seasonal morph type on the capture rate of traps baited with fermentation odours. Starved flies were trapped at greater rates compared to fed flies; more virgin flies were trapped than mated flies; flies deprived of an oviposition substrate were trapped more frequently than flies given an oviposition substrate. It is still unclear whether age or seasonal morphology affect bait response. Lastly, a caged choice experiment investigated the relationship between female reproductive status and attraction to fermentation or fruit odours. Fermentation-based traps captured female flies regardless of their reproductive status but, ripe fruit-based traps were more attractive to flies with more than seven eggs. In summary, studies that use fermentation-based traps should recognize that capture rates of D. suzukii will depend on the feeding, mating and oviposition experiences of the population; also, fruit-based traps may better target gravid females.