Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Where vectors collide: the importance of mechanisms shaping the realized niche for modeling ranges of invasive Aedes mosquitoes.

Abstract

The vector mosquitoes Aedes aegypti (L.), native to Africa, and Aedes albopictus (Skuse), native to Asia, are widespread invasives whose spatial distributions frequently overlap. Predictive models of their distributions are typically correlative rather than mechanistic, and based on only abiotic variables describing putative environmental requirements despite extensive evidence of competitive interactions leading to displacements. Here we review putative roles of competition contributing to distribution changes where the two species meet. The strongest evidence for competitive displacements comes from multiple examples of habitat segregation where the two species co-occur and massive reductions in the range and abundance of A. aegypti attributable to A. albopictus invasions in the southeastern U.S.A. and Bermuda (U.K). We summarize evidence to support the primacy of asymmetric reproductive interference, or satyrization, and larval resource competition, both favoring A. albopictus, as displacement mechanisms. Where evidence of satyrization or interspecific resource competition is weak, differences in local environments or alternative ecologies or behaviors of these Aedes spp. may explain local variation in the outcomes of invasions. Predictive distribution modeling for both these major disease vectors needs to incorporate species interactions between them as an important process that is likely to limit their realized niches and future distributions. Experimental tests of satyrization and resource competition are needed across the broad ranges of these species, as are models that incorporate both reproductive interference and resource competition to evaluate interaction strengths and mechanisms. These vectors exemplify how fundamental principles of community ecology may influence distributions of invasive species.