Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Influence of multiple- and single-species infestations on herbivore-induced cotton volatiles and Anthonomus grandis behaviour.

Abstract

Plants interact with multiple organisms throughout their life cycle. As a result, they are commonly attacked by multiple species of herbivores, leading to the induction of plant defence systems. Herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) play an important role in the interaction between community members and can be used to manipulate insect pest behaviour, being a valuable tool in integrated pest management strategy. In this study, the interaction of two chewing insects, the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis, and the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, and of one piercing-sucking insect, the Neotropical brown stinkbug, Euschistus heros, was evaluated for the induction of volatile compounds in cotton under single- and multiple-species attacks. As a control, the emissions of undamaged plants were also measured. In addition, the effect of HIPVs on boll weevil behaviour was also assessed. Qualitatively, single- and multiple-species herbivory induced a similar volatile blend. There was, however, a difference in the amount and proportion of compounds emitted. Plants infested with E. heros emitted a blend of volatiles more similar to that of the undamaged control compared to the other herbivore-induced treatments. The plant volatiles emitted due to simultaneous multiple-species herbivory were induced faster than volatiles emitted by sequential herbivory events, indicating different induction mechanisms depending on the attack configuration. In addition, cotton volatiles induced by an individual attack of A. grandis were attractive to conspecifics, as were the volatiles induced by multiple-species herbivory in both simultaneous and sequential attacks. The use of cotton HIPVs, both under multiple- and single-species attack, can be used for the development of alternative methods for semiochemical-based weevil management, e.g., enrichment of aggregation pheromone traps with plant volatiles.