Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Male origin determines satyrization potential of Aedes aegypti by invasive Aedes albopictus.

Abstract

Rapid displacements of resident Aedes aegypti by invasions of Aedes albopictus have been documented in the southeastern United States and Bermuda. Interspecific mating has been detected in nature between these species and proposed as a likely mechanism for these displacements by means of asymmetric reproductive interference, or satyrization. However, rapid displacements of A. aegypti have not been detected in most localities where these two invasive species are known to co-occur. Aedes albopictus invaded the United States and Brazil at approximately the same time, in the mid-1980s, but the origins of the invading strains are known to be different. Here we tested the hypothesis, in standardized cage environments, that A. albopictus males from Brazil are less capable of satyrizing A. aegypti females than A. albopictus males from the United States. Using strains of A. aegypti and A. albopictus from the United States of known susceptibility to and capacity for interspecific mating, we demonstrate that A. albopictus colonized from collections in the Brazilian cities of Rio de Janeiro and Manaus were relatively unsuccessful in inseminating virgin female A. aegypti from Key West Florida compared to A. albopictus from peninsular Florida. We suggest that the low satyrization potential of Brazilian A. albopictus males may contribute to the lack of documented competitive displacements of A. aegypti in that country.