Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Ethnobotanical knowledge of pastoral community for treating livestock diseases in Somali regional state, eastern Ethiopia.

Abstract

Modern livestock health care is still at its lowest stage in Ethiopia and most modern veterinary services like drugs and veterinary professionals are not accessible and affordable to the majority of pastoral farmers. As a result, they rely on their traditional knowledge and practices on locally available. However, this traditional knowledge has not yet been well documented. Therefore, this study identified medicinal plants used in treating animal diseases and examined factors that threatens ethno-veterinary in pastoral community of Shinle Districts. The survey study conducted on 180 households to collect data using a semi-structured questionnaire and filed guided observations. Data were analyzed by using SPSS. Thirty-one plant species belonging to 18 families used against 14 types of livestock diseases. Majority of plant species fall under Fabaceae (22.5%) and Euphorbiaceae (16.1%) family that are largely shrubs. The most used plant parts were roots (35.5%) followed by leaves (25.8%). Remedy preparation was mainly through chop and soak in concoction of water and salt. Oral, topical, and nasal route were the common mode of administration. The principal threats of medicinal plants were invasive plants, drought, over grazing, agricultural activity, and firewood collection. Endogenous knowledge on ethno-veterinary medicinal plants was accepted orally from healer's forefathers and transmitted similarly. Awareness should raise and ethno-veterinary medicine should integrate in to livestock extension delivery systems for the need to exploit the possibility of discovering more medicinally viable plants. Further studies needed under controlled conditions on the efficacy and veterinary properties of such plant products and livestock disease treatments.