Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Effects of genotypes and sex on growth performance of Yoruba ecotype and crossbred grower chickens.

Abstract

Information on adaptability and crossbreeding potentials of exotic birds are important to improve animal protein supply in the tropics. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance of exotic grower chicks and their crossbred under a humid tropical environment. A total of 547 chicks which belong to 10 genotypes (Yoruba ecotype, YEC; Sussex, SS; Goliath, GO; Marshall, ML and six crossbred genotypes) were evaluated for growth performance from 8 to 20 weeks of age. Marshall grower chicks were significantly higher (p<0.05) in weekly body weights than, Yoruba ecotype, Sussex and Goliath, and the six crossbred genotypes throughout the 12 weeks study. Crossbred chicks that were produced from Marshall cocks and Yoruba ecotype hens were significantly heavier (p<0.05) in weekly body weights than SS × SS, Go × GO and other crossbred chicks. Male chicks were significantly higher (p<0.05) in weekly body weights than female chicks from 9 to 20 weeks of age. There were significant (p<0.05) interaction between genotype and sex on body weights of crossbred chicks. Reciprocal effect was significant (p<0.05) on body weight of chicks in all the crossbred groups. Reciprocal effect favoured chicks that were born to purebred cocks and Yoruba ecotype hens. The study therefore recommends the use of Marshall cocks and Yoruba ecotype hens to improve poultry meat production in Nigeria.