Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

First report of Fusarium meridionale and Fusarium incarnatum causing dry rot of Konjac in China.

Abstract

The cultivation of konjac (Amorphophallus konjac) is limited by several diseases such as soft rot, southern blight, dry rot, anthracnose, and viruses. Recently, dry rot has become a serious issue during storage (from November to April) of parent corm at 7 to 10°C, 70 to 80% humidity. The incidence of dry rot during storage varies from 20 to 30% in the mountainous area of southwest China. In November 2015, corm dry rot symptoms were found in Enshi, Hubei Province, China. Symptoms appeared as rot and dry shrinkage with yellow or red mycelium covering the affected corm tissue. Twenty to 30% of parent corms were symptomatic. Based on the results of morphological observations, sequence analysis of the translation elongation factor-1α gene and pathogenicity tests, two causal agents were identified, namely F. meridionale and F. incarnatum. This is thought to be the first report of F. meridionale and F. incarnatum causing dry rot on konjac in China.