Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

First report of seasonal trap capture for Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) and native stink bugs in Central Georgia.

Abstract

With the expansion of H. halys in Georgia (USA), this invasive pest can co-occur with native stink bug species in agricultural crops. This paper presents the results of a study conducted to monitor H. halys, as well as native stink bugs, using pheromone-baited traps placed near woodland field edges at a field crop farm in 2016. Wheat, maize, soyabean and sorghum were grown on the 82.6-ha farm. H. halys and 8 native stink bugs, Euschistus servus, Murgantia histrionica, Euschistus tristigmus, Thyanta custator custator, Nezara viridula, Holcostethus limbolarius, Chinavia hilaris and Trichopepla semivittata, were captured. The frequency of occurrence for phytophagous stink bug species in traps was highest for H. halys (35.5%) and E. servus (33.8%), followed by M. histrionica (15.5%) and E. tristigmus (9.8%). The sex ratio of H. halys, E. servus and E. tristigmus females to males was ∼1:1. For the remaining 5 stink bug species, the frequency of occurrence was less than 5%. Except for Thyanta custator custator and Trichopepla semivittata, nymphs as well as adults were captured. H. halys were captured from mid-May to late October. The traps first captured adults on 16 May, and nymphs were first captured the week of 30 May. The mean number of H. halys adults and nymphs captured from June through mid-July ranged from 0 to 0.4 insects per trap. By 24 July, the number of nymphs in traps increased until peaking on 8 August. Adults peaked in traps from early to mid-August. Afterward, H. halys adults apparently moved to other areas, for trap captue was very low. This is thought to be the first seasonal trap capture for H. halys in Georgia, where the species has become established.