Invasive Species Compendium

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Abstract

Giant hogweed at its northern distribution limit in North America: experiments for a better understanding of its dispersal dynamics along rivers.

Abstract

We studied the reproduction and dispersal of giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) at its northern distribution limit in North America (Québec, 2014-2016) to better understand the invasion dynamics of the species along rivers. Seeds were collected from a riparian population to conduct germination, floatation, and dispersal experiments. Data were analysed in comparison with a real invasion case that was initiated about 10 years ago along a river system. In Québec, giant hogweed individuals produce on average 14,000 to 16,000 seeds with a germination rate of 75-85%. Seeds with endosperm that fall in water likely sink within 5 hr. Along a small brook, most disperse over short distances (<40 m) in summer, although some can travel 100-300 m. These data suggest that late-summer or early-fall water dispersal of seeds would not explain the magnitude and rapidity of the invasion patterns observed along streams. We suggest that late-fall and, especially, spring floods are the most efficient dispersal vectors for giant hogweed seeds and are likely responsible for the establishment of populations kilometres downstream from introduction points along river systems. The spread of giant hogweed would consequently be less influenced in the near future by a rise in temperature than by a change in the magnitude or timing of flood events.