Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Improved surveillance for early detection of a potential invasive species: the alien Rose-ringed parakeet Psittacula krameri in Australia.

Abstract

The Rose-ringed parakeet Psittacula krameri is the most widely introduced parrot in the world, and is an important agricultural pest and competitor with native wildlife. In Australia, it is classified as an 'extreme threat', yet captive individuals frequently escape into the wild. The distribution and frequency of incursions are currently unknown, as are the potential impacts of the species in Australia. This lack of critical ecological information greatly limits effective biosecurity surveillance and decision-making efforts. We compiled a unique dataset, which combined passive surveillance sources from government and online resources, for all available information on parakeet detections at-large in Australia. We investigated whether geographic variables successfully predicted parakeet incursions, and used species distribution models to assess the potential distribution and economic impacts on agricultural assets. We recorded 864 incursions for the period 1999-2013; mostly escaped birds reported to missing animal websites. Escapes were reported most frequently within, or around, large cities. Incursions were best predicted by factors related to human presence and activity, such as global human footprint and intensive land uses. We recommend surveillance of high (predicted) establishment areas adjacent to cities where a feral parakeet population could most affect horticultural production. Novel passive surveillance datasets combined with species distribution models can be used to identify the regions where potential invasive species are most likely to establish. Subsequently, active surveillance can be targeted to the areas of highest predicted potential risk. We recommend an integrated approach that includes outreach programs involving local communities, as well as traditional biosecurity surveillance, for detecting new incursions.