Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Seasonal parasitism and host specificity of Trissolcus japonicus in northern China.

Abstract

The brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål), native to China, Japan, and Korea, has emerged as a harmful invasive pest of a variety of crops in North America and Europe. The Asian egg parasitoid Trissolcus japonicus has been identified as the most promising agent for classical biological control of invasive H. halys populations. A 4-year study evaluated the fundamental and ecological host ranges of T. japonicus as well as its phenology and impact on H. halys populations in fruit orchards in its native range in northern China. In laboratory no-choice tests, developmental suitability of eight non-target host species for T. japonicus was demonstrated by the successful production of progeny on the majority (>85%) of non-target host species tested. In field-collected, naturally laid egg masses, T. japonicus was the most abundant parasitoid associated with H. halys and Dolycoris baccarum, but was also sporadically found in Plautia crossota. Furthermore, it was regularly reared from sentinel egg masses of Menida violacea, Arma chinensis, and Carbula eoa. The only species that did not support development in the laboratory and field was Cappaea tibialis. Besides the benefit of having a high impact on H. halys populations in Northern China, the risk assessment conducted in the area of origin indicates that native Pentatomidae in North America and Europe could be negatively impacted by T. japonicus. Whether the benefits of T. japonicus outweigh the possible risks will have to be evaluated based on the outcome of additional host range studies in the two invaded regions.