Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Native (Ruditapes decussatus) and non-indigenous (R. philippinarum) shellfish species living in sympatry: comparison of regulated and non-regulated biotoxins accumulation.

Abstract

The native Ruditapes decussatus and the non-indigenous Ruditapes philippinarum are an important target of shellfish industries. The aim of this study was to compare an invader with a native species living in sympatry in the view of marine biotoxins accumulation. Samples were analysed for regulated and non-regulated biotoxins. The consistently occurrence of okadaic acid-group toxins and BMAA, may cause human health problems and economical losses. A strong positive relationship was observed between species, with significantly higher DSP toxicity in R. decussatus. Similar toxin profiles dominated by DTX3 in both species suggests similar metabolic pathways. Lower DSP toxicity in R. philippinarum may favour their cultivation, but a tendency for higher levels of the non-regulated BMAA was observed, indicating risks for consumers that are not monitored. This study highlights the need to better understand the physiological responses and adaptations allowing similar species exposed to the same conditions to present different toxicity levels.