Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Synergistic cytotoxic and anti-invasive effects of mitoxantrone and triterpene saponins from Lysimachia ciliata on human prostate cancer cells.

Abstract

Triterpene saponins are secondary metabolites typical for higher plants. They possess a wide range of pharmaceutical and biological activities. These include anti-inflammatory, vasoprotective, expectorant, and antitumor properties. In particular, the ability of saponins to enhance the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic drugs has opened new perspectives for their application in combined cancer chemotherapy. In this study, the biological activity of the saponin fraction isolated from Lysimachia ciliata (denoted as CIL-1/2) was evaluated to assess its chemosensitizing activity in prostate cancer cell lines (DU-145, PC-3). No cytotoxic or cytostatic effect of the CIL-1/2 fraction administered at the concentration of 0.5 µg/mL was observed. In contrast, cocktails of CIL-1/2 and mitoxantrone (a drug commonly used in prostate cancer therapy) exerted synergistic cytostatic and proapoptotic effects. Furthermore, the synergy of proapoptotic activities of the analyzed cocktails is accompanied by their synergistic effects on prostate cancer cell movement and invasiveness. The significantly weaker impact of this cocktail on normal prostate cells additionally adds to the significance of our data and confirms that the CIL-1/2 fraction might be considered a potent adjuvant for prostate cancer chemotherapy.