Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Rhizobium altiplani sp. nov., isolated from effective nodules on Mimosa pudica growing in untypically alkaline soil in central Brazil.

Abstract

Root nodule bacteria were isolated from nodules on Mimosa pudica L. growing in neutral-alkaline soils from the Distrito Federal in central Brazil. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of 10 strains placed them into the genus Rhizobium with the closest neighbouring species (each with 99% similarity) being Rhizobium grahamii, Rhizobium cauense, Rhizobium mesoamericanum and Rhizobium tibeticum. This high similarity, however, was not confirmed by multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) using three housekeeping genes (recA, glnII and rpoB), which revealed R. mesoamericanum CCGE 501T to be the closest type strain (92% sequence similarity or less). Chemotaxonomic data, including fatty acid profiles [with majority being C19:0 cyclo ω8c and summed feature 8 (C18:1ω7c/C18:1ω6c)], DNA G+C content (57.6 mol%), and carbon compound utilization patterns supported the placement of the novel strains in the genus Rhizobium. Results of average nucleotide identity (ANI) differentiated the novel strains from the closest species of the genus Rhizobium, R. mesoamericanum, R. grahamii and R. tibeticum with 89.0, 88.1 and 87.8% similarity, respectively. The symbiotic genes essential for nodulation (nodC) and nitrogen fixation (nifH) were most similar (99-100%) to those of R. mesoamericanum, another Mimosa-nodulating species. Based on the current data, these 10 strains represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium for which the name Rhizobium altiplani sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BR 10423T (=HAMBI 3664T).