Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Development of polymorphic microsatellite markers of Obolodiplosis robiniae (Haldeman) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), a North American pest invading Asia.

Abstract

Microsatellite markers were developed for epidemiological studies on the black locust gall midge Obolodiplosis robiniae (Haldeman) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), a native North America pest introduced to Europe and Asia. Polymorphism at each locus was tested on 68 individuals from six populations reared from infected host leaves of Robinia pseudoacacia L. collected in China. Fourteen loci were found to be polymorphic, with the number of alleles ranging from 3 to 10. The observed heterozygosity varied evenly from 0.2667 to 0.6540. For populations, the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.1429 to 1.000. The allele frequency of the predominant allele varied from 0.250 to 0.500. All loci with negative FST values indicated heterozygote excess in each locus with six populations. Of 14 loci, four were observed to have FST values up to 0.05, which indicated negligible genetic differentiation within the population. Significant deviations (P<0.05) from the expected Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, as evaluated using the Markov chain algorithm for each locus and for all six populations, were observed, and genotypic linkage disequilibrium was clearly detected. These markers represent a useful tool to design strategies for integrated pest management and in the study of population evolution in this important introduced pest.