Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

First report of Pestalotiopsis microspora causing postharvest rot of kiwifruit in Hubei Province, China.

Abstract

Postharvest rot disease of kiwifruit has recently become a serious problem in China, the world's largest kiwifruit (Actinidia sp.) cultivating and exporting country. During cold storage, symptoms began as slightly shriveled areas on fruit peel. After 6 to 10 days at room temperature, the inside of these infected fruits became milky white and watery, then finally, severely decayed and sour smelling. Botryosphaeria dothidea and Phomopsis sp. were previously identified in affected fruits in Sichuan Province and Shanghai fruit market, respectively, but kiwifruit rot-causing pathogens have not been systematically studied across China. Between October and December 2014, fruits of 5 cultivars (Jinyan, Hongyang, Jinkui, Guichang and Qinmei) were collected from 7 provinces (Hubei, Sichuan, Henan, Chongqing, Jiangxi, Guizhou and Shaanxi), China's main kiwifruit-cultivating regions. After 2 months' cold storage, 28 fruits developed soft rot symptoms. The common pathogens B. dothidea and Phomopsis sp. were isolated from most rotting fruit, but four novel, morphologically identical isolates were identified from Jinyan cultivars from Wuhan (Hubei Province). Based on morphological characteristics, molecular data (sequence analysis of the rDNA internal transcribed spacer and beta-tubulin regions) and pathogenicity tests, the isolates were identified as P. microspora. This is thought to be the first report of P. microspora causing kiwifruit rot in China.