Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Impact of climate change on the invasive traits of weeds.

Abstract

Invasive weeds degrade ecosystems and are a threat to plant and animal biodiversity. The literature on biological invasions suggests that only 10% of introduced species become invasive in a new host range. Most introduced plants do not become invasive in a new environment. The invasive behavior of a weed depends on the weed's genetic variability, biotic factors, and climatic factors with which it interacts. The climatic factors that affect the invasive traits of weeds include the atmospheric temperature, soil temperature, precipitation, evaporation, and CO2 concentration. The biological traits that are influenced by a change in any one or more of these climatic factors include the pattern of assimilate partitioning, induction of dormancy or seed germination, herbivore tolerance, propagule production and distribution, variability of plant architecture, photosynthetic rate, and seedbank longevity. The impact of climate change on the invasive traits of certain weed species is reviewed.