Invasive Species Compendium

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Abstract

Manage weeds in ginger field with dried coconut leaves.

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a study conducted in India using organic and plastic mulching materials to determine the best weed management practice for weed control in ginger. The treatments comprised application of green leaves of Glycosmis pentaphylla to a thickness of 5 cm at the time of planting of ginger rhizomes and later at 45 and 90 days after planting (DAP) (farmers' practice); dried paddy straw at 6 t/ha; coir pith compost; one month old dried coconut leaves at 5400 kg/ha alone at the time of planting (TAP) and with green leaves at 7.5 t/ha each at 45 and 90 DAP; uprooted cowpea plants at 45 DAP and green leaves at 7.5 t/ha at 90 DAP; and Lantana camara leaf at 30 t/ha. Three colours of polythene mulch (25µ), i.e. ash, white and black, were used. Among dicots, the most predominant weed species were Spermacoce latifolia, Mimosa pudica, Ageratum conyzoides, Oldenlandia auricularia, Cleome rutidosperma, Oxalis corniculata and Ludwigia hyssopifolia. Among monocots, the major weeds were Kyllinga monocephala [K. brevifolia], Mollugo pentaphylla and Cyperus rotundus. The application of paddy straw at 6 t/ha+green leaf mulch at 45 and 90 DAP increased the yield by 36%, recorded 72% weed control efficiency and received a net income of 5.99 lakhs/ha compared to farmers' practice. The application of dried coconut leaves alone at TAP increased the yield by 11%, with weed control efficiency of 64% and net income of Rs 4.3 lakhs/ha. Elimination of green leaf mulch at 45 and 90 DAP is an added advantage and can be adopted in ginger as well as coconut growing areas of the country. The plastic mulches had no beneficial effect on weed management in ginger.