Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Butanol fraction of Parkia biglobosa (Jacq.) G. Don leaves enhance pancreatic β-cell functions, stimulates insulin secretion and ameliorates other type 2 diabetes-associated complications in rats.

Abstract

Ethnopharmacological relevance: Ethnopharmacological surveys have reported that Parkia biglobosa (Jacq.) G. Don (Leguminosae) is among the plants commonly used in the traditional management of diabetes mellitus in Nigeria and Togo. Aim of the study This study investigated the anti-diabetic activity of the butanol fraction of P. biglobosa leaves (PBBF) in a type 2 diabetes (T2D) model of rats and a possible bioactive compound in the fraction. Materials and methods: T2D was induced by feeding rats with a 10% fructose solution ad libitum for two weeks followed by an intraperitoneal injection of 40 mg/kg body weight streptozotocin and the animals were orally treated with 150 and 300 mg/kg BW of the PBBF for five days in a week. Another group of rats was non-diabetic but similarly administered with 300 mg/kg BW of the PBBF. Food and fluid intakes, body weight changes and blood glucose levels were monitored during the experiment while other relevant diabetes-associated parameters were measured at the end of the experiment. Results The PBBF treatments significantly (P<0.05) decreased the blood glucose levels and improved the glucose tolerance ability compared to untreated diabetic rats. Furthermore, the treatments were found to improve pancreatic β cell function (HOMA-β), stimulate insulin secretions, decrease insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), restore liver glycogen, ameliorate serum dyslipidaemia and prevent hepatic and renal damages compared to untreated diabetic rats. Phytochemical analysis of the fraction led to the isolation of lupeol which inhibited α-glucosidase and α-amylase in non-competitive and uncompetitive inhibition patterns respectively. Conclusion It was concluded that PBBF possessed remarkable anti-T2D activity which is mediated through modulation of β-cell function and stimulation of insulin secretion and the lower dose (150 mg/kg BW) was found optimum for anti-T2D activity compared to the high dose (300 mg/kg BW) in this study.