Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Climbing plants in the Irmão Teodoro Luis Botanical Garden, Southern Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil.

Abstract

Climbing plants have been the subject of specific studies in Rio Grande do Sul state only in the last few decades. The present study is the first floristic survey on climbing plants performed in the Pampa biome, an endangered plant formation with high diversity that covers the southern half of the state, having continuity with neighboring countries. The study was carried out in a Permanent Preservation Area in the municipality of Capão do Leão (31°48′S, 52°25′W). Field collections were conducted on a monthly basis, from May 2011 to July 2013, covering the area edges and interior, through the Walking Method. Climbing species were classified according to the climbing mechanism as twiners, scramblers, tendril climbers or root climbers. As for stem consistency, species were classified as herbaceous, semi-woody or woody. We found 44 species distributed across 27 families and 39 genera. Bignoniaceae, Convolvulaceae and Passifloraceae, each one with four species, and Apocynaceae, Fabaceae and Rosaceae, with three species each, were the families with the highest species richness. The predominant climbing mechanism was the twining one, followed by tendril climbing and scrambling; no root-climbing species was found. The herbaceous consistency was the most frequent one, followed by semi-woody and woody. All 44 species occurred on the edge, 15 of them also occurring on the interior. The floristic composition of the area regarding climbing plants suggests anthropic influence, and the presence of invasive species highlights the need for management strategies. A list of the taxa found and identification keys for the families and species are shown.