Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Developing ecological site and state-and-transition models for grazed riparian pastures at Tejon Ranch, California.

Abstract

Ecological site descriptions and associated state-and-transition models are useful tools for understanding the variable effects of management and environment on range resources. Models for woody riparian sites have yet to be fully developed. At Tejon Ranch, in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California, we are using ecological site theory to investigate the role of two managed ungulate populations, cattle and feral pigs, on riparian woodland communities. Responses in plant species composition, woody plant recruitment, and vegetation structure will be measured by comparing cattle and feral pig management treatments among and between areas with similar abiotic conditions (ecological sites). Results from the second year of this project highlight the spatial variability of riparian woodland vegetation communities as well as temporally and spatially variable abundances of cattle and feral pigs. Development of riparian ecological site descriptions and state-and-transition models provide both a generalizable framework for evaluating management alternatives in riparian areas, and also specific direction for managing cattle and feral pigs.