Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Phytotoxicity of the organic phase and major compound obtained from the fruit pulp of Crescentia cujete L. (Bignoniaceae).

Abstract

The phytotoxicity of ethanol extracts, of the organic phase and major compound (cinnamic acid) obtained from the fruit pulp of Crescentia cujete L., were evaluated for their potential to inhibit seed germination, hypocotyl development and radicle development of the invasive weeds Senna obtusifolia (L.) Irwin & Barneby and Mimosa pudica Mill. The organic phase at a concentration of 0.5% inhibited 100% seed germination of both weeds. Cinnamic acid obtained from the organic phase inhibited seed germination by 95% for S. obtusifolia and 99% for M. pudica at a concentration of 0.1%, with concentrations (%) inhibiting 50% (IC50) seed germination equal to 0.063% and 0.037%, respectively. For the seedling growth bioassays, the toxicity of the cinnamic acid was more efficient for the S. obtusifolia radicle (IC50 equal to 0.009%), and for M. pudica the IC50 values were 0.097% and 0.117% for the radicle and hypocotyl, respectively. This research reinforces the phytotoxic potential of cinnamic acid, verified initially in the organic phase (in ethyl acetate), which is rich in this phenylpropanoid.