Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Do three invasive species: Amaranthus blitoides, Descurainia sophia and Bassia scoparia, respond to soil properties?

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a study conducted to examine whether differences in soil properties at reclaimed wellsites explain differences in colonizing species, i.e. mat amaranth (Amaranthus blitoides), herb sophia (Descurainia sophia), and burningbush (Bassia scoparia). The study area is located in southeastern Alberta, Canada, within the northern Grassland of the North American Great Plains. Four sites were located south of Brooks (sites C10-16, C15-08, C16-08, and C06-24) and a fifth located in the Pinhorn Grazing Reserve (site C07-21). All 5 one-ha wellsites were reclaimed with topsoil in the spring of 2012 and treated with native hay as a seed source in July 2012. Each one-ha wellsite was divided into 16 equal subplots, 25 Ă— 25 m each. In 2012, prior to sowing treatment, 3 randomly placed soil samples were taken in each subplot. Soils were sampled to a depth of 10 cm and analysed for total carbon, nitrogen, pH, electrical conductivity, sodium absorption ratio, magnesium, calcium, potassium and sodium. The results indicate significant differences in both the percentage cover of the invasive species and the soil properties at the 5 reclaimed wellsites.