Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Detection of Avian Bornavirus, Polyomavirus and Circovirus in biological samples, using PCR and RT-PCR technique, from psittacine bird with different clinical manifestation.

Abstract

Viruses are important pathogens in avian health and may lead to outbreaks that threaten significantly the population of birds. The Avian Bornavírus (ABV), Circovirus (BFDV) and Avian Polyomavirus (APV) are the most common viral agents that threaten parrots in captivity. The ABV is responsible for the proventricular dilation (PDD) in parrots and other birds, a lethal neurological disease, which was discovered in the early eighties in Europe and North America the disease. The first APV infection in birds has been described in young Australian budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus), after being associated with high mortality and morbidity in other parrots. The BFDV is the causative agent of Beak and Feathers Disease, which occurs almost exclusively in psittacines, especially in aviary, quarantine birds and pet stores. A total of 120 captivity parrots were tested in Brazil for BFDV and APV and 112 samples for ABV, resulting in 21 (17.5%) positives for APV, 41 (34.17%) for BFDV and 32 (28.57%) for ABV. Among the positive animals, fourteen had concomitant infection, six were positive for both APV and BFDV, seven for BFDV and ABV, and one sample was positive for BFDV, APV and ABV. Among BFDV positive animals, most common clinical signs were apteria and apathy/anorexia, for APV positive birds were apathy/anorexia, while for ABV were neurological signs were the most represented. The detection of APV, BFDV and ABV demonstrate the occurrence of all tested viruses in captive parrots in Brazil, including exotic and native species.