Invasive Species Compendium

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Abstract

Dengue viruses in Aedes albopictus Skuse from a pineapple plantation in Costa Rica.

Abstract

In August 2012, local vector control personnel attended to a complaint of a high abundance of mosquitoes close to an organic pineapple plantation in the district of La Virgen, Sarapiqui County, Heredia Province, Costa Rica. Adult mosquitoes were collected in the periphery of the organic pineapple plantation by the vector control personnel as part of their response to the complaint of neighbours. A total of 1425 adult mosquitoes, preliminarily identified as Aedes albopictus, were collected. Identification of 700 mosquitoes was confirmed using taxonomic identification keys. The mosquitoes were separated according to sex, and bodies and heads were sectioned and grouped into pools of 20 each. Thirty-five pools of bodies and the corresponding pools of heads were obtained, with 32 pools corresponding to females (p1 to p32) and 3 pools to males (p33 to p35). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis and DNA sequencing were performed to detect the presence of dengue virus RNA and to determine dengue type in positive mosquito pools. Dengue virus RNA was detected in 8 of 32 (25%) pools of A. albopictus female bodies and also in 2 pools of the corresponding female heads. One of 3 (33%) pools of male bodies also contained dengue virus RNA, although it was not detected in the corresponding pool of heads. PCR products corresponding to dengue 1, 2 and 4 viruses were obtained from pools p24, p29 and p30, respectively. The presence of dengue viruses in field-collected A. albopictus associated with an organic pineapple plantation in Costa Rica suggests that there may be transmission or permanence of the virus in this mosquito population.