Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Fusarium cerealis, a new pathogen causing ginseng (Panax ginseng) root rot in China.

Abstract

Jilin Province, China, is the world's largest ginseng (Panax ginseng) cultivation area, accounting for ∼70% of global production. The root rots of ginseng caused by Fusarium spp. are one of the most serious threats to ginseng production. Seriously infected ginseng roots are not marketable, leading to enormous losses. The canopy of infected ginseng plants exhibit symptoms of red or yellow leaves from lower to upper during early plant development and growth, wither and wilt in the later stages, and lastly die. All parts of the root can be infected; brown or black lesions were mainly formed on surface and expanded gradually, and mature lesions are gray-brown. Samples of 208 Fusarium rotted roots of ginseng (cultivar landrace damaya) from Ji'an city and Dunhua city of Jilin Province were collected from April to September 2012. Based on morphological observations, molecular investigations (sequence analysis of the partial rDNA internal transcribed spacer, translation elongation factor-1α gene and putative reductase gene) and pathogenicity tests, the causal agent was identified as F. cerealis [Gibberella pulicaris]. This is thought to be the first report of F. cerealis causing root rot on ginseng in China.