Invasive Species Compendium

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Abstract

First report of plant-parasitic nematodes on seashore Paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum) in Barbados.

Abstract

In Barbados, on a newly constructed golf course, seashore paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum) 'Sea Isle Supreme' sprigs were imported from Georgia (United States) and were planted over 2006 and 2007 on greens, tees, fairways, and rough. Golf greens were constructed following the United States Golf Association Green Section (Far Hills, New Jersey) putting green guidelines. Tees and fairways were constructed using native soil. Two years after the grow-in, the putting greens began to exhibit irregular chlorotic patches, followed by gradual thinning and decline of turfgrass stand density in those areas. Additionally, turfgrass roots sampled from those symptomatic patches appeared to be abbreviated compared to non-symptomatic areas of the greens. A survey was conducted in May 2013 to determine if plant-parasitic nematodes were present coinciding with the observed symptoms, which were similar to those described in a previous report. No plant parasitic nematodes were present in any of the samples from the non-symptomatic areas, whereas 3 genera of plant parasitic nematodes were found in all the samples from the symptomatic areas: Helicotylenchus, Mesocriconema and Pratylenchus. Nematode populations of these genera averaged 30, 60, and 200 nematodes per 100 cm3, respectively. This is thought to be the first report of plant parasitic nematodes associated with seashore paspalum maintained as putting greens in Barbados.