Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Analysis of boiling stable antioxidant enzymes in invasive alien species of Lantana under abiotic stress-like conditions.

Abstract

Alien plants have broad distribution throughout the world, in agriculture, forest,and natural areas displacing native vegetation, stunting or diminishing the growth, or development or establishment of native plants. Lantana is an annual invasive weeds of Verbenaceae (verbena) family, is native to tropical America while widespread in North America, many parts of Africa, Australia, and India. It tolerates a wide variety of abiotic conditions in the natural habitat. In order to gain insight into the biochemical basis of invasiveness of invasive alien species, in the present study, the abiotic stress condition-induced changes on reactive oxygen species contents (ROS) and ROS scavenging boiling stable antioxidant enzymes (peroxidase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase) were studied in three different most prevalent varieties of Lantana: pink (more invasive), red (moderate invasive), and violet (less invasive). Among all the enzymes studied, SOD was only detected as boiling stable. Indices of oxidative stress, superoxide radical and H2O2 content increased under low- and high-temperature conditions in a genotype- and tissue-dependent manner. For example, compared to other varieties, pink variety which is more invasive, showed higher ROS coupled with malondialdehyde contents under adverse abiotic conditions. As a result, it was postulated that pink genotype may have more efficient mechanism to scavenge ROS species as shown by the increase in boiling stable SOD(BsSOD) activity accompanied by enhanced accumulation of BsSOD isoenzymes. Based on the results, it can be inferred that plants which are more invasive may have more biochemical capacity to perform biological antioxidative reactions to combat abiotic stress-induced oxidative stress.