Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Report of EMS survey 2013/14.

Abstract

The aims of extra-mural studies (EMS) set out below reinforce the flexibility to tailor EMS to fit the individual student and get away from the idea that placements should always cover a breadth of species for each student. The survey was circulated to the 2012 and 2013 cohorts of graduates of UK veterinary schools (1543 graduates) on 16 January 2014, with a deadline for response of 14 February 2014. Respondents were asked a series of questions about how they booked EMS placements and their experience of doing so. The total number of responses was 287, a response rate of 18.6%. The most frequently specified species, or areas of veterinary work that were covered on EMS but not at university were: exotics (57 responses), small furries (24 responses), birds (18 responses), zoo medicine (16 responses), pigs (11 responses), wildlife (8 responses), poultry (8 responses), cattle (7 responses), goats (5 responses), alpacas (5 responses), first opinion equine (3 responses), and donkeys (3 responses). Other species, or areas or veterinary work that were mentioned by one or two respondents only were: more in-depth feline work; behavioural medicine; aquarium species; equine passport; laboratory animals; abbatoir; export; embryo transfer work in cattle and sheep; communication skills; charity work; government work; reindeer; research work; work with dogs overseas; rare breed farm animals; racehorse work. The most frequently specified medical and/or surgical procedures that were covered on EMS but not at university were: neutering/cat or dog castration/cat or bitch Spays (114 responses), bovine caesareans (20 responses), Mass removal/lumpectomy (19 responses), dental work (15 responses), placing catheters (12 responses), suturing/stitch-ups (11 responses), LDA/RDA operations (11 responses), equine castration (8 responses), wound management/debridement (7 responses), taking blood samples (7 responses), ovine caesareans (6 responses), cattle castration (5 responses), injections (5 responses), ophthalmology (5 responses), treating abscesses (4 responses), hernia repair (4 responses), ultrasound (4 responses), intubation (4 responses), rabbit castration (3 responses), aural haematomas (3 responses), disbudding (3 responses), orthopaedics (3 responses), TECA (3 responses). Other procedures that were mentioned by one or two respondents only were: Anal gland expression; removing grass from a cat's throat; treating broken claws; worming, vaccination; tracheal lavage; chest drain; enucleation; CT scans; IVRA on a horse; taking skin scrapes; performing cytology; perineal urethrostomy on a cow; taking X-rays; physical examination; interpreting bloodwork; writing up SOAPs; fluid therapy; anaesthesia; caslicks; epidural; pregnancy scans on cows; anal sac removal; cytotomy; digit amputation; venipuncture; calvings and lambings; bandaging; muscular injury treatment; claw amputation; equine nerve blocks; prescribing medication and drug dosage; thoracocentesis; glucose curves; neurological operations; contrast radiography; endoscopy. The key points arising from the results are summarised in this report, which also makes some recommendations for consideration.