Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Common snook [Centropomus undecimalis (Bloch, 1792)] preys on the invasive Amazon sailfin catfish [Pterygoplichthys pardalis (Castelnau, 1855)] in the Palizada River, Campeche, southeastern Mexico.

Abstract

This study was conducted to investigate the predation of armored catfish (Pterygoplichthys pardalis) by fish predators (e.g. Centropomus undecimalis) in the Palizada River, Campeche, southeastern Mexico. Results showed that among the 64 captured common snook measured from 62 to 96 cm in total length; total weight ranged from 2050 to 4470 g; 20 of the stomachs contained food. Fish predominated in the diet and contributed 95.45% by frequency of occurrence, 95.65% by number and 99.23% by wet weight. Mollusks were second in frequency of occurrence, but only one species appeared, Rangia cuneata. Based on the index percentage of relative importance, the principal species consumed by the common snook is P. pardalis with 57.7%. The high percentage of P. pardalis in the Index of Relative Importance can be correlated with the substantial increment in the densities of the Amazon sailfin catfish observed in the last years in the Palizada River.