Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Vector control measures failed to affect genetic structure of Aedes aegypti in a sentinel metropolitan area of Brazil.

Abstract

In order to evaluate subpopulation differentiation, effective population size (Ne) and evidence for population bottlenecks at various geographic levels, Aedes aegypti larvae were collected longitudinally from 2007 to 2009 from four areas in the city of Salvador, Brazil. The DNA from each larva was isolated and genotyped with five independent microsatellite markers. FST and Jost's D revealed significant population structuring (P<0.05) at the municipal and regional levels, while only RST was able to detect genetic differentiation at the level of strata within these areas. Ne analysis from longitudinal data did not show any evidence of significant change in population structure. The census population measured by the house index, however, showed a significant trend toward decrease in these areas. Active vector control measures did contribute to vector reduction, but this was not enough to decrease A. aegypti population genetic diversity in Salvador. The understanding of A. aegypti population dynamics may be helpful for planning and evaluation of control measures to make them more effective.