Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

The invasive neotropical ambrosia beetle Euplatypus parallelus (Fabricius, 1801) in the Oriental region and its pest status (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Platypodinae).

Abstract

Euplatypus parallelus (Fabricius, 1801), a species of ambrosia beetle native to South and Central America, is now present almost throughout the Oriental region, and in parts of Wallacea and New Guinea. It was probably accidentally imported to the region by human agency in timber or unseasoned wood after the Second World War. The actual source and original site of importation is unknown, but it has been widespread in Sri Lanka from the 1970s and present in Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand from the 1980s. It is now the dominant species of platypodine ambrosia beetle in some of the national parks of Thailand. It may attack living trees, but normally only when the trees are stressed. It may transmit Fusarium wilt fungi, although not normally a primary vector. Dense attacks, especially if combined with fungal attack, can kill trees. Due to its abundance, it can also be a major cause of damage to the wood of recently felled trees and sawn timber.