Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

First report of Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) in Tomato, pepper, and jimsonweed in Puerto Rico.

Abstract

Tomatoes in south and southwestern coastal areas of Puerto Rico were observed with symptoms typical of tospovirus infection in a 2006-07 tomato survey, and again between December 2012 and February 2013 at the University of Puerto Rico's Juana Diaz Experiment Station and on commercial farms in Santa Isabel. Tomato symptoms during this most recent outbreak included: necrotic spots on leaves; general necrosis of leaves, petioles, and stems; death of growing points of plants; and wilting. In 2012 and 2013, bell pepper and jimsonweed (Datura stramonium) with ringspots, irregular chlorotic areas, and deformation of leaves were also observed on commercial farms in this region. Serological testing using a variety of commercially available enzyme-linked immunorbent assay and lateral flow immunoassay diagnostic reagents, as well as RT-PCR assay revealed the causal agent as Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV). Four thrips species, Frankliniella schultzei, F. kelliae, F. bruneri and Thrips palmi, were identified from tomato, pepper, and weed flowers in the vicinity of symptomatic plants in December 2012 and January 2013. Of these species, F. schultzei is known to be an efficient vector of TCSV and has been previously reported as abundant in vegetables in Puerto Rico. This is thought to be the first report of TCSV in Puerto Rico and the first report of TCSV infection of jimsonweed from any location.