Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Ichthyofaunal diversity of Kulsi river: prime habitat of dolphin.

Abstract

North East India is very rich in faunal and floral diversity. It is the conjunction of Himalaya and In-Burma biodiversity hotspots. Kulsi, a river of Kamrup District originated from Meghalaya and fall into the River Brahmaputra. In Kulsi river, a good numbers of piscivorous Dolphin (Platanista gangetica gangetica) is present which is schedule-I species under the Wildlife Protection Act, 1972 once wide spread throughout the Kulsi as well as Brahmaputra River. Few studies have investigated that 29 Dolphin were present in Kulsi River in February, 2009 (Wakid). This paper highlights the list of fish species available inclusive of the causes which could be held accountable for growing decline of diversity. The study was carried out from March 2010 to April 2011. 63 species of fish belonging to 8 orders and 21 families were recorded. Out of these 6 are exotic and the rest are indigenous having ornamental as well as economic values. Cyprinids (family: Cyprinidae), Live fish (family: Anabantidae, Clariidae, Channidae, Heteropneustidae), Cat fish (family: Bagridae, Silurdae, Schilbeidae), Clupeids (family: Clupeidae), featherbacks (family: Notopteridae), Loaches (family: Cobitidae), Eels (family: Mastacembelidae), Glass fishes (family: Chandidae) and Gobies (family: Gobiidae) are the major groups of fishes which spotted in the river. Cyprinidae is the most dominant family throughout the river. In some places around Kulsi river people are highly dependent on fishing. Day by day the availability of fish is slowly declining due to anthropogenic stress. People use different types of gears for fishing which are the major threats for the fish population. Awareness among the people and the fisher is inevitable. At the breeding time fishing should be banned in Kulsi River to immediate take of action.