Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), the causal agent of High Plains disease, is present in Ohio wheat fields.

Abstract

High Plains disease was first described in wheat in Nebraska, Idaho, Texas, and other High Plains states in 1993-94. The causal agent is a negative sense RNA virus in the genus Emaravirus with at least three genome segments, which is transmitted by the wheat curl mite (Aceria tosichella). This virus is variously referred to as High Plains virus (HPV), Maize red stripe virus (MRSV/MRStV), or Wheat mosaic virus [Soil-borne wheat mosaic virus] (WMoV) in the literature. The presence of WMoV in Ohio was revealed through a comprehensive survey conducted in early spring 2012. Specifically, wheat plants exhibiting virus-like symptoms including chlorosis, reddening, stunting, spotting, or striping were collected from 27 wheat fields in 14 counties throughout Ohio, between 20 March and 15 April 2012. The identity of the virus was confirmed by high throughput RNA-sequencing, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay and protein A sandwich-ELISA with WMoV-specific antiserum. This is thought to be the first report of WMoV in Ohio.