Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Nutritional ecology of the invasive freshwater mysid Limnomysis benedeni: field data and laboratory experiments on food choice and juvenile growth.

Abstract

The introduction of alien species leads to changes in species composition and therefore the trophic structure. The highly invasive freshwater mysid Limnomysis benedeni is established and abundant in Lake Constance since 2006. Our aim was to confirm the assumption that L. benedeni feds on small particles and to identify their food web position. We examined the feeding mode and food preference of adult L. benedeni collected from the field and from laboratory feeding experiments by analysing their stomach contents. Stable isotope analyses (SIA) confirm an omnivorous feeding of L. benedeni. In laboratory growth experiments, we determined the growth of juveniles by feeding juveniles with different natural food sources. Growth was supported by natural biofilm, dreissenid biodeposited material and an algal suspension. Stomach analyses showed clearly that L. benedeni fed on small particles of both benthic and pelagic origin and fed by both filtering and grazing. Absence of high numbers of animal structures in the stomachs and SIA supported the lack of predatory impact in the field, but the mysid probably affects the nutrient cycles in the littoral. L. benedeni seems to play an important role in the trophic relations in Lake Constance and all other water bodies they invaded.