Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

A report on the occurrence of and crop damage caused by Hyphantria cunea (Drury) with in Korea.

Abstract

Occurrence Hyphantria cunea was confirmed in 35 cities and counties nationwide in 2011, each of which reported some form of crop and/or ecological damage caused by the moth. Only a larva of the black-headed form were reported to have occurred in the nation. H. cunea was found in street trees 66.7%, followed by landscape trees 19.4% and forests 13.9%. This suggests that artificial environment 86.1% suffered from H. cunea more severely than natural forests. The study identified 44 families and 102 species of host plants, and found an additional 29 species, to those which had been identified in previous studies. At present, the identified host plants of H. cunea are composed of 62 families and 219 species in total since their first appearance was reported approximately 50 years ago. Host plants include 5 species of food crops (2.3%), 6 species of vegetables (2.7%), 4 species of medicinal crops (1.8%), 1 species of industrial crops (0.5%), 13 species of fruit trees (5.9%), 6 species of other trees crops (2.7%) as well as a further 5 species of farmed crops (2.3%). Seven species of host plants (18.4%) originate from North America where Hyphantria cunea has been introduced from, while 11 species (29.0%) are from China and Japan, Europe and India were the native sources of (10.5%) of the origin with 4 species, respectively. Seventeen species of trees, including Platanus occidentalis L., Ulmus davidiana (var.) japonica (Rehder) (Nakai) and Cornus officinalis (Siebold & Zucc) were heavily noted to be heavily infected with larval populations.