Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Comparing the potential for dispersal via waterbirds of a native and an invasive brine shrimp.

Abstract

Migratory waterbirds are likely to have a major role in the spread of many exotic aquatic invertebrates by passive dispersal. However, in the field, this has so far only been confirmed in the case of the American brine shrimp Artemia franciscana, which is spreading quickly around the Mediterranean region. We compared experimentally the capacity of A. franciscana and the native brine shrimp Artemia parthenogenetica to disperse via migratory shorebirds. After Artemia resting eggs (cysts) were fed to Redshank Tringa totanus and Dunlin Calidris alpina, we compared the proportion that survived gut passage, their hatchability and their retention time within the gut. We also tested the ability of cysts to stick to the feathers of Black-tailed Godwit Limosa limosa. The proportion of ingested cysts retrieved from faeces was the same for each Artemia species (8%), and there were no significant differences in retention time (mean 1.2h and maximum 10 h for A. parthenogenetica, 1.4 and 12 h for A. franciscana) or hatchability (11% versus 14%). The two shorebird species showed similar retention times and retrieval rates, but cysts recovered from Dunlin had a significantly higher hatchability. Only one of the 1000 A. parthenogenetica cysts and three of the 1000 A. franciscana cysts stuck to feathers. These results indicate that both non-native and native brine shrimps have a similar high capacity for endozoochory via birds, and that the invasiveness of A. franciscana is probably explained by its competitive superiority owing to high fecundity and release from cestode parasitism. Owing to their different migratory behaviour, Redshank and Dunlin are likely to have different roles as brine shrimp vectors. Brine shrimps provide a suitable model for understanding the role of birds in the dispersal of exotic aquatic invertebrates.