Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Effects of thermal acclimation and photoacclimation on lipophilic pigments in an invasive and a native cyanobacterium of temperate regions.

Abstract

The freshwater cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii spreads from tropical to temperate regions worldwide. This entails acclimation to varied light and temperature conditions. We studied the thermal and light acclimation of the photosynthetic machinery of C. raciborskii by monitoring alteration of the chlorophyll a and carotenoid content in German strains of C. raciborskii, in African and Australian strains of C. raciborskii, and in German strains of Aphanizomenon gracile, a native cyanobacterium belonging to the same order (Nostocales). Our results showed that temperate and tropical C. raciborskii strains did not differ in pigment acclimation to light and temperature. In contrast, the ratio of photoprotective carotenoids (namely the carotenoid glycoside 4-hydroxymyxol glycoside [aphanizophyll]) to chlorophyll a increased significantly more in C. raciborskii in comparison with A. gracile (1) with decreasing temperatures from 20 to 10°C and a moderate light intensity of 80 µmol photons m-2 s-1 and (2) with increasing light intensities at a suboptimal temperature of 15°C, compared to 20°C. We conclude that below 20°C photoinhibition is avoided by greater photoprotection in the invasive species C. raciborskii compared to the native species A. gracile.