Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

The position of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii/Mirb./Franco) and its natural regeneration at Training Forest District Hůrky of the Secondary Forestry Schools in Písek.

Abstract

Douglas fir is the most perspective introduced species in a number of countries of Central and Western Europe. In Great Britain, France and Germany, the species is grown on hundreds of thousands of hectares. In the Czech Republic, its proportion amounts to only 4,400 ha (0.17% forest land). From this point of view, the Hůrky Training Forest District of Secondary Forestry Schools in Písek with the proportion of Douglas fir amounting to 13.8% shows an interesting and important position. Its production potential as compared with domestic conifers (spruce, pine and larch) is double to threefold. Douglas fir regenerates there spontaneously (generally, it refers to acid sites), namely at shelterwood, border and group felling. The density of its regeneration ranges at a level of 43 to 98 thousand trees per hectare. From the practical point of view, it is necessary to apply tending measures, i. e. cleaning, in these dense young stands in time.